Sueng Bung Fai with traditional Isan dressing and local long drum show. Photo taken in Suwannaphum District, Roi Et, Thailand on June 6, 2015.
New Issues, Thailand Philately

New Issues: Thailand [April 2018]

After nearly two months without any new stamps, Thailand Post is set to release two sets within the next four days for a total of eight stamps and one souvenir sheet.

Thailand TH-1144 Thai Heritage Conservation Day 2018 commemorative stamp set, release date April 2, 2018 Thailand TH-1144 Thai Heritage Conservation Day 2018 souvenir sheet, release date April 2, 2018Thailand TH-1144 Thai Heritage Conservation Day 2018 First Day Cover, release date April 2, 2018

Thailand TH-1144 Thai Heritage Conservation Day 2018 pictorial postmarks, release date April 2, 2018
Thailand TH-1144 Thai Heritage Conservation Day 2018 commemorative stamp set with souvenir sheet, release date April 2, 2018

Due tomorrow, April 2, 2018, is the annual set marking Thai Heritage Conservation Day (วันอนุรักษ์มรดกไทย — Wan Anurak Moradok Thai). Marking the birthday of the popular Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn (มหาจักรีสิรินธร), a stamp collector and designer herself, the special day has been observed since 1995. Unfortunately, I don’t have any information about the murals portrayed on this year’s stamp set. Four 3-baht stamps plus a souvenir sheet which will be sold for 15 baht are scheduled to be issued under the Thailand Post catalogue number of TH-1144.

Thailand TH-1144 Thai Traditional Festivals 2018 commemorative stamp set, release date April 4, 2018 Thailand TH-1144 Thai Traditional Festivals 2018 First Day Cover, release date April 4, 2018

Thailand TH-1144 Thai Traditional Festivals 2018 pictorial postmarks, release date April 4, 2018
Thailand TH-1144 Thai Traditional Festivals 2018 commemorative stamp set, release date April 4, 2018

On April 4, the annual set of four Thai Traditional Festivals set will be released under the Thailand Post number TH-1145. This year’s subject is the spectacular Sky Rocket Festival (ประเพณีบุญบั้งไฟ — Prapheni Bun Bang Fai), a merit-making ceremony traditionally practiced by ethnic Lao people throughout much of the Isan region of northeastern Thailand and Laos near the beginning of the wet season. Celebrations typically include preliminary music and dance performances, competitive processions of floats, dancers and musicians on the second day, and culminating on the third day in competitive firings of home-made rockets.

Rocket Festival, Yasothon ประเพณีบุญบั้งไฟ จังหวัดยโสธร
Rocket launch at Yasothon, Thailand ประเพณีบุญบั้งไฟ จังหวัดยโสธร
Sueng Bung Fai with traditional Isan dressing and local long drum show. Photo taken in Suwannaphum District, Roi Et, Thailand on June 6, 2015.
Sueng Bung Fai with traditional Isan dressing and local long drum show. Photo taken in Suwannaphum District, Roi Et, Thailand on June 6, 2015.

Local participants and sponsors use the occasion to enhance their social prestige, as is customary in traditional Buddhist folk festivals throughout Southeast Asia. The most famous celebrations are those held in Yasothon’s provincial capital staged annually over the Friday, Saturday, and Sunday that falls in the middle of May. In 2018, I believe this is May 18-20 but haven’t been able to confirm those dates yet. It appears that the photographs used for Thailand’s new stamps were taken at Yasathon. The festival is one I’ve long wanted to attend and will make an extra effort this year (it can be difficult to take more than two days off from work). At the very least, I will put together an article about the Skyrocket Festival for my A Stamp A Day blog next month.

In the meantime, here’s some video from the 2016 Rocket Festival at Kut Wa in Kalasin Province, Thailand:

The next stamps on the Thailand Post calendar is a 2-stamp set marking the 60th anniversary of diplomatic releations between Thailand and Turkey (TH-1146), scheduled for release on May 12. There is also a four-stamp set (TH-1147) scheduled for May 14 to mark Vesak Buja Day (วันวิสาขบูชา — Wan Wisakhabucha). This is a Buddhist observance commemorating the birth, enlightenment and passing of the Buddha, traditionally at the full moon of the sixth Thai lunar month (May). In Thailand, it is also observed as National Tree Day.

April 6 in Thailand is observed as Chakri Memorial Day (วันจักรี — Wan Chakkri), which commemorates the establishment of the Chakri Dynasty and the founding of Bangkok by King Phutthayotfa Chulalok in 1782. Officially known as King Phutthayotfa Chulalok the Great Day and Chakri Dynasty Memorial Day (วันพระบาทสมเด็จพระพุทธยอดฟ้าจุฬาโลกมหาราชและวันที่ระลึกมหาจักรีบรมราชวงศ์), this year the date will see the release of the first new banknotes and coins bearing the likeness of His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun (มหาวชิราลงกรณ บดินทรเทพยวรางกูร). In the West, he is called simply King Rama X. Banknotes in the denominations of 20, 50 and 100 baht will be released on April 6 as well as coins denominated 10, 5, 2, and 1 baht plus 50, 25, 10, 5, and 1 satang (all of the satang coinage is basically useless, retailers usually will round up or give customers 25- or 50-satang coins in change but refuse to accept them as payment; the lowest values are so that banks can balance their account books and probably won’t reach circulation).

Thailand King Rama X Definitive Stamps (Series I), scheduled for release July 28, 2018.
Pre-Order announcement for Thailand King Rama X Definitive Stamps (Series I), scheduled for release July 28, 2018.

The first Rama X definitive stamps were originally scheduled to have been released on April 6 as well but are now delayed until July 28. That date is known in English as King Maha Vajiralongkorn’s Birthday but in Thai it is วันเฉลิมพระชนมพรรษาสมเด็จพระเจ้าอยู่หัวมหาวชิราลงกรณ บดินทรเทพยวรางกูร — Wan Chaloem Phra Chonmaphansa Somdet Phra Chao Yu Hua Maha Wachiralongkon Bodinthrathepphayawarangkun. Have I mentioned that I have given up trying to learn the language due to mouthfuls such as this? There will be twelve stamps released that date bearing Rama X’s portrait in denominations of 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 12, 15, 50, and 100 baht. The total face value is 220 baht, plus it appears that there will also be a souvenir sheet containing all 12 stamps to be sold for 250 baht. The stamps are now available for pre-order, as evidenced by the pictured advertisement I found on Facebook.

Although King Maha Vajiralongkorn accepted the throne on the night of December 1, 2016, and King Bhumibol Adulyadej was cremated on October 26, 2017, a coronation for the new king has yet to be held.

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New Issues

New Stamp Issues: U.S.A. [February & March 2018]

The two principal countries from which I collect new stamp issues each year, Thailand and the United States, have remained fairly quiet thus far in 2018.  Thailand Post hasn’t released anything at all since February 7 but that is about to change (I’ll dedicate the next article to the planned April releases). The United States Postal Service has had three stamp issues (one a set of ten) since I last blogged about U.S. stamps back on February 9.

The first of these was a set of ten (50¢) forever commemorative stamps picturing “Bioluminescent Life” (specifically, deep-ocean octopus, midwater jellyfish, deep-sea comb jelly, mushroom, firefly, bamboo coral, white marine worm, crown jellyfish, pale blue marine worm, and sea pen) released on February 22 at Fort Pierce, Florida, in panes of 20. Bioluminescence is the production and emission of light by a living organism, a form of chemiluminescence. This occurs widely in marine vertebrates and invertebrates, as well as in some fungi, microorganisms including some bioluminescent bacteria and terrestrial invertebrates such as fireflies. In some animals, the light is bacteriogenic, produced by symbiotic organisms such as Vibrio bacteria; in others, it is autogenic, produced by the animals themselves.

In a general sense, the principal chemical reaction in bioluminescence involves some light-emitting molecule and an enzyme, generally called the luciferin and the luciferase, respectively. Because these are generic names, the luciferins and luciferases are often distinguished by including the species or group, i.e. Firefly luciferin. In all characterized cases, the enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of the luciferin.

The first day of issue city, Fort Pierce, is home to ORCA, the Ocean Research & Conservation Association. ORCA’s CEO and Senior Scientist is Dr. Edith Widder, who took the photographs that appear on seven of the stamp images. The selvage — or area outside the stamps — features a transparent deep-sea comb jelly (photo by Gregory G. Dimijian), surrounded by images of the firefly squid (photos by Danté Fenolio). Art director Derry Noyes designed the stamps and selvage from existing photographs. They were printed by Banknote Corporation of America at Browns Summit, North Carolina, with a total of 40,000,000 selft-adhesive stamps printed. The panes are printed in the following arrangementt:

  • Row 1: deep-ocean octopus and midwater jellyfish (photos by Edith Widder);
  • Row 2: deep-sea comb jelly (photo by Edith Widder), mushroom (photo by Taylor F. Lockwood);
  • Row 3: firefly (photo by Gail Shumway), bamboo coral (photo by Edith Widder);
  • Row 4: marine worm and crown jellyfish (photos by Edith Widder);
  • Row 5: marine worm (photo by Steve Haddock) sea pen (photo by Edith Widder).

On March 5, a single self-adhesive stamp was released in Springfield, Illinois to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Illinois statehood. The first Europeans to visit Illinois were the French explorers Louis Jolliet and Jacques Marquette in 1673, but the region was ceded to Britain after the French and Indian War. After the American Revolution, Illinois became a territory of the United States, and achieved statehood on December 3, 1818.

The stamp art features an outline of the state map with a series of yellow beams that are meant to look like rays of a rising sun. In similar fashion, the Postal People tell us “the yellows and blues symbolize the dawning of a new day as the state joins the Union. Stars, representing the first 20 states, grace the top of the stamp. The rising sun symbolizes the 21st star.” Illinois artist Michael Konetzka designed the stamp; Antonio Alcalá was the art director. They were printed by Banknote Corporation of America in Browns Summit, North Carolina, using offset printing in a quantity of 25,000,000 stamps.

The stamp is available from USPS online sales and phone outlets. Although other post offices may order them, they are being distributed automatically only to Post Offices in Illinois.

I can recall watching “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” as a child growing up in West Texas but I don’t remember much about it. The USPS released a single self-adhesive stamp on March 23 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, picturing the show’s host, Fred Rogers (1928-2003), The stamp also pictures King Friday XIII, a Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood puppet character hailing from “The Neighborhood of Make-Believe.”

Rogers’ groundbreaking public television series inspired and educated young viewers with warmth, sensitivity and honesty. Filmed in Pittsburgh and first distributed nationally in 1968 by a predecessor of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), the program was innovative and unlike anything on television for children at that time. Each episode of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” began with its host welcoming the audience into his television house. While singing “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” Rogers always put on his trademark cardigan, changed into sneakers and then introduced the day’s topic. He discussed many of the experiences of growing up, delicately covering everything from sharing and friendship to difficult subjects like anger, fear, divorce and death.

Derry Noyes was the art director, designer and typographer on this stamp while the artist was Walt Seng. Printed using offset by the Banknote Corporation of America in Browns Summit, North Carolina, 12,000,000 stamps were printed in panes of 20.

Currently, the United States Postal Service has two releases scheduled for April: a set of four to be issued on April 6 in order to bring awareness to the role of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education “in keeping the United States a global leader in innovation and providing new opportunities for all Americans to learn and explore the world” as well as a single Peace Rose stamp due on April 21. I’ll report more on these next month.

2018-01-01 Year of the Dog [TH-1141]
Chinese New Year, New Issues, Topical Pursuits

New Issues – Thematic Wrap-Up: Year of the Dog

Today is the first day of the Lunar New Year,  known popularly as Chinese New Year or the Spring Festival (simplified Chinese: 春节; traditional Chinese: 春節; pinyin: Chūn Jié). For a number of years, my adopted home of Thailand issued Zodiac stamps usually on January 1 and then a Chinese New Year set (often depicting various deities) a few weeks later. Last year, there was no Chinese New Year stamp and that has been repeated this year as well. Many nations have released Year of the Dog stamps, most with a distinctive Chinese slant, and a few have released issues more focused on the Spring Festival itself. If you are a dog lover, there are some very attractive topical stamps issued so far in 2018. To read more about the background of Chinese New Year, please have a look at my article on A Stamp A Day.

BHUTAN: Year of the Dog, released January 20, 2018

2018-01-20 [Bhutan] Chinese New Year


CANADA: Chinese New Year, released January 15, 2018

2018-01-15 [Canada] Chinese New Year 2018-01-15 [Canada] Chinese New Year 2018-01-15 [Canada] Chinese New Year 2018-01-15 [Canada] Chinese New Year


PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA: Year of the Dog, released January 5, 2018

2018-01-15 [Canada] Chinese New Year 2018-01-15 [Canada] Chinese New Year


PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA: Spring Festival, released January 10, 2018

2018-01-15 [Canada] Chinese New Year


CHRISTMAS ISLAND: Year of the Dog, released January 8, 2018

2018-01-08 [Christmas Island] Chinese New Year 2018-01-08 [Christmas Island] Chinese New Year 2018-01-08 [Christmas Island] Chinese New Year


FRANCE: Happy New Year, released February 2, 2018

2018-01-08 [Christmas Island] Chinese New Year


FRENCH POLYNESIA: Year of the Dog, released February 16, 2018

2018-02-16 Chinese New Year [French Polynesia]


GIBRALTAR: Year of the Dog, released January 30, 2018

2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year


GUERNSEY: Year of the Dog, released February 3, 2018

2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year


HONG KONG S.A.R., CHINA: Year of the Dog, released January 27, 2018

2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year 2018-01-30 [Gibraltar] Chinese New Year


INDONESIA: Chinese New Year, released February 1, 2018

2018-02-01 Chinese New Year [Indonesia] 2018-02-01 Chinese New Year [Indonesia]


ISLE OF MAN: Year of the Dog, released February 8, 2018

2018-02-01 Chinese New Year [Indonesia]


JERSEY: Year of the Dog, released January 5, 2018


KAZAKHSTAN: Chinese New Year, released January 1, 2018

2018-01-01 [Kazakhstan] Chinese New Year miniature sheet


KYRGYZSTAN: Chinese New Year, released January 30, 2018


MACAU, CHINA: Year of the Dog, released January 5, 2018


MALAYSIA: Working Dogs, released January 13, 2018


MONGOLIA: Year of the Dog, released January 5, 2018

2018-01-05 [Mongolia] Chinese New Year


THE NETHERLANDS: Year of the Dog, released January 29, 2018


NEW CALEDONIA: Year of the Dog, released February 16, 2016

2018-02-16 Chinese New Year [New Caledonia]


NEW ZEALAND: Year of the Dog, released January 10, 2018


SINGAPORE: Year of the Dog (personalized stamps), released January 5, 2018

2018-01-05 [Singapore] Chinese New Year [peronalized stamps]


SLOVENIA: Year of the Dog, released January 26, 2018

2018-01-26 Chinese New Year [Slovenia]


TAJIKISTAN: Year of the Dog, released January 26, 2018

2018-01-26 Chinese New Year [Slovenia]


THAILAND: Year of the Dog, released January 1, 2018

2018-01-01 Year of the Dog [TH-1141]


UNITED NATIONS: Chinese New Year personalized sheet, released February 2, 2018

2018-01-01 Year of the Dog [TH-1141]


UNITED STATES: Zodiac Year of the Dog, released January 11, 2018

2018-01-11 [United States] Year of the Dog [Honolulu, HI]


WALLIS & FUTUNA ISLANDS: Year of the Dog, released February 16, 2018

2016-02-16 Chinese New Year [Wallis & Futuna]

Love on Stamps, New Issues, Topical Pursuits

New Issues – Thematic Wrap-Up: Love 2018

Happy Valentine’s Day!

A week ago, I posted a blog entry about Thailand’s Symbol of Love 2018 stamp release. Of course, the Land of Smiles is not the only nation promoting the theme of LOVE philatelicly. Below are images of other stamps that have been released recently which you may wish to use on any Valentine’s Day cards you’d like to mail (people do that, right?). At the very least, these may inspire you to buy something special for your significant other on what we call in Thailand Wan Rak (“day of love”). I recommend giving flowers or chocolate, NOT stamps or first day covers unless your loved-one also happens to share your beloved hobby.

AUSTRALIA: With Love, released February 6, 2018

Australia - Love, released February 6, 2018Australia - Love, released February 6, 2018

Australia - Love, released February 6, 2018


FRANCE: Valentine’s Day/50th Anniversary of Fashion House, released January 12, 2018

France - Valentine's Day/50th Anniversary of Fashion House, released January 12, 2018

France - Valentine's Day/50th Anniversary of Fashion House, released January 12, 2018 France - Valentine's Day/50th Anniversary of Fashion House, released January 12, 2018


IRELAND: Love & Marriage, released February 8, 2018

Ireland - Love & Marriage, released February 8, 2018


LEBANON: Spread Your Love, released February 7, 2018

Lebanon - Spread Your Love, released February 7, 2018

Lebanon - Spread Your Love, released February 7, 2018 [sheet]

Lebanon - Spread Your Love, released February 7, 2018 [First Day Cover, front]

Lebanon - Spread Your Love, released February 7, 2018 [First Day Cover, back]


MOLDOVA: Organ Transplant Promotion, released January 11, 2018

While this stamp from the land-locked Eastern European nation of Moldova looks similar to the other stamps in this theme, the purpose of this issue is actually to promote Organ Transplants which are probably the ultimate gift of love!

Moldova - Organ Transplant Promotion, released January 11, 2018Molodva - Organ Transplant Promotion, released January 11, 2018 [sheet]

Molodva - Organ Transplant Promotion, released January 11, 2018 [FDC]


SLOVENIA: Love, released January 26, 2018

Slovenia - Love, released January 26, 2018

Slovenia - Love, released January 26, 2018 [sheet]


THAILAND: Symbol of Love, released February 7, 2018 [Thailand Post #TH-1148]

Thailand TH-1143: Symbol of Love Postage StampThailand - Symbol of Love, released February 7, 2018 [sheet]

Thailand - Symbol of Love, released February 7, 2018 [FDC]


UNITED STATES: Love Flourishes, released January 18, 2018 [Scott #5255]

United States: Love Flourishes, released January 18, 2018 [Scott #5255]

United States: Love Flourishes, released January 18, 2018 [sheet]

United States: Love Flourishes, released January 18, 2018 [sheet liner]

United States: Love Flourishes, released January 18, 2018 [fFDC]

United States: Love Flourishes, released January 18, 2018 [FDC with digital color postmark]

United States: Love Flourishes, released January 18, 2018 [first day of issue cermeony program]

Flags on Stamps, New Issues

Issued Today (February 9, 2018): United States – U.S.A. Flag

The United States Postal Service is issuing a new definitive stamp today — February 9, 2018 — at the American Stamp Dealers Association’s ASDA Winter Postage Stamp Show in Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310. The USPS’s two contract security printers — Ashton Potter of Williamsville, New York, and Banknote Corporation of America in Browns Summit, North Carolina — have each printed a coil and a double-sided pane, creating a total of four collectible varieties of this design. All four varieties are pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) and are Forever stamps to pay the First-Class Mail rate, currently 50 cents.

United States stamps picturing the national flag in vivid red, white and blue have been available to the public almost continuously since 1957. This eye-catching new issuance continues that tradition with a striking graphic design of the flag with two crisp folds. Ethel Kessler served as art director for this stamp, which features a digital illustration by Kit Hinrichs. It is one of two U.S. flag stamps currently scheduled for release in 2018, the other being a commemorative stamp in the same basic design to this definitive, marking the 200th anniversary of the Flag Act enacted by Congress on April 4, 1818. This final Flag Act (of three) provided for the modern rule of having thirteen stripes to represent the original thirteen colonies and having the number of stars match the number of states. It also provided that subsequent changes in the number of stars be made on July 4, Independence Day.

Mailers in the United States like to use flag stamps on their mail as it is thought they have a better chance of being opened; however, most volume mailers use non-denominated stamps to pay a base fee, 5¢ for example, then pay the remaining postage by check or balance transfer. So this stamp will be used mostly by small businesses and individuals.

Full technical details and information on ordering first day of issue postmarks (the deadline is April 9, 2018) can be found in USPS Postal Bulletin 22484 (January 4, 2018). Postal Bulletin 22486 (February 1, 2018) pictures a black & white pictorial postmark for the first day of issue.

 

New Issues

Issued Today (February 7, 2018): Thailand – Symbol of Love

Thailand TH-1143: Symbol of Love Postage Stamp
Thailand TH-1143: Symbol of Love Postage Stamp

Thailand Post is issuing its annual Symbol of Love stamp today — February 7, 2018 — at post offices throughout the Kingdom. The single 5-baht stamp has been given the issue number 1143 and is released just in time for Valentine’s Day (วันวาเลนไทน์ — Wan Wal-en-thyn), which is a very big event here in Thailand. Most Thais refer to it as Wan Rak (วันรัก) which means “day of love”.

While giving boxes of chocolate is not very popular (it melts easily in the heat — February tends to be one of the hottest months in Thailand) and I have never seen a candy heart here, flowers seem to be even more popular of a gift than in the United States. Even though the price does increase a bit this time of year, the cost of bouquets and individual long-stemmed flowers is still dirt-cheap compared to most Western countries.

In the early morning hours the day before Valentine’s Day, thousands of street stalls suddenly appear EVERYWHERE and start selling anything that is red or pink or both: stuffed bears, plush hearts, and tons of flowers. In the schools, the students (and it doesn’t matter whether you’re in kindergarten or a high school senior) will walk around plastering all manner of heart stickers on each other’s shirts. By the end of the day, everybody is covered head to toe in pink and red stickers (including some of the teachers!). One finds hearts that have fallen off of shirts affixed to sidewalks for weeks afterwards.

Photo taken by Mark Joseph Jochim at Piboonsawasdee Municipal School on February 14, 2013.
Photo taken by Mark Joseph Jochim at Piboonsawasdee Municipal School on February 14, 2013.

Yes, Valentine’s Day in Thailand is mostly about who gets the most gifts and flowers to show off (and the girls love walking around carrying bears and huge bouquets all day long).

While many will go out to eat dinner, it is rare to see Thai people holding hands in public other than the younger generation (no doubt, influenced by us Western visitors who aren’t so chaste). For those who stay at home, there are special Valentine’s Day television programs shown all day long on almost every channel. Mostly, these are cheesy game shows and comedies.

For philatelists (some in Thailand actually have girlfriends and wives!), a number of the Bangkok area post offices have special Valentine’s Day cancellations available. These are in addition to the regular first day of issue postmarks (again, most branches in Bangkok will offer special pictorial cancellations today). I often wish that Phuket would do something similar (at least the Philatelic Museum counter) and have occasionally thought about moving to the capital simply in order to obtain postmark-filled covers on release dates. But then I think of the traffic congestion and pollution and come to my senses.

Photo ©2018 Thai Stamp Museum

The postmarks, press release and first day cover pictured above came courtesy of Thailand Post’s collector-oriented Facebook page (called “Stamp In Love”). The following images were shared this afternoon on the Thai Stamp Museum Facebook page:

Photo ©2018 Thai Stamp Museum
Photo ©2018 Thai Stamp Museum
Photo ©2018 Thai Stamp Museum

I hope all of you enjoy Wan Rak with your significant other. If you want to be a little adventurous, why not give these Thai love phrases a try?

Photo ©2018 Thailand Stamp Museum
Photo taken by Mark Joseph Jochim at Piboonsawasdee Municipal School on February 14, 2013.
Photo taken by Mark Joseph Jochim at Piboonsawasdee Municipal School on February 14, 2013.
New Issues, Olympics on Stamps, Topical Pursuits

Stamps for the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea

Once again, the Olympics are upon us. I don’t watch many sports but I have tuned-in to watch the Olympics ever since I can remember. In fact, I can recall viewing bits of the 1976 summer games held in Montréal and being disappointed when the United States boycotted the Moscow-hosted edition in 1980.

While I casually collected the U.S. stamps released for those two Olympic years, by the time of the 1984 winter games I was philatelically “all in”. I designed my own cachets for not only the first day covers of the stamps (different designs for blocks and singles) but also for the special postmarks available from the post offices along the torch relay route and for the various venues themselves. I began collecting Olympic memorabilia and amassed a great amount of Lake Placid 1980 souvenir magazines, clothing, even ticket stubs. When Tai Babilonia and Randy Gardner were forced to withdraw from the gold medal round of the pairs figure skating due to Gardner’s groin injury, I wrote them a condolence letter and received a reply back. That was really the peak of my Olympic collecting activities, although I did dabble every four years until my first real break from stamps around 200o or 2001 — a philatelic hiatus that lasted until shortly after I moved to Thailand permanently in 2015. Sadly, that collection remained in the U.S. and is now gone.

Mist rises behind the Olympic Rings during day 12 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Laura Cross-country Ski & Biathlon Center on February 19, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)
Mist rises behind the Olympic Rings during day 12 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Laura Cross-country Ski & Biathlon Center on February 19, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)

I still get excited when the Olympics come around and, since Lake Placid, I prefer the Winter Olympics more than the Summer. The 2018 edition — the XXIII Olympic Winter Games (Les XXIIIes Jeux olympiques d’hiver in French and 제23회 동계 올림픽 in Hangul, pronounced Je-isipsamhoe Donggye Ollimpik) — are being held from February 9 through the 25 in Pyeongchang County, South Korea. Interest is very high here in Thailand as there is a very large Korean population. These will be South Korea’s second Olympic Games and its first Winter Games; Seoul hosted the Summer Olympics in 1988. There are now 2,952 participating athletes registered from 92 nations with a total of 102 events in seven sports (15 disciplines).

Amazingly, a unified Korean team consisting of players from both North Korea and South Korea will compete in the women’s ice hockey tournament following talks in Panmunjom on January 17. Of the 35 players on the team, 12 are from North Korea and 23 are from South Korea. Although Russia participated in the 2014 Winter Olympics, following a doping controversy the Russian NOC was barred and the Russian athletes are participating in Pyeonchang as the “Olympic Athletes from Russia”.

The National Olympic Committee of Thailand is scheduled to field a team of four athletes in the 2018 Winter Olympics, the largest delegation it has sent since its Winter Olympic debut in 2002. Thailand qualified one male — Nicola Zanon — and one female — Vanessa Vanakorn — alpine skier. In cross-country skiing, Thailand qualified two athletes, one male and one female. Mark and Karen Chanloung are siblings who are half-Italian and half-Thai. They grew up in Gressoney-La-Trinité, Italy.

South Korea released it’s first stamps for PyeongChang 2018 way back on August 3, 2011. It had been announced as the host city on July 6, 2011, having won its bid in the first round of voting, receiving more votes than both Munich, Germany and Annecy, France combined.

South Korea - 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 1, 2017 [souvenir sheet #1]
South Korea – 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 1, 2017 [souvenir sheet #1]
South Korea - 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 1, 2017 [souvenir sheet #2]
South Korea – 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 1, 2017 [souvenir sheet #2]

On November 1, 2017. South Korea issued two miniature sheets containing ten 330-won stamps each portraying the PyeongChang 2018 emblem and the official mascot — official mascot, Soohorang (수호랑), a white tiger — as an athlete in the various sports. The Paralympic Games, which will follow, have a different mascot — Bandabi (반다비), an Asiatic black bear.

This photo taken February 4, 2017 shows the mascot for the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympic Games, a white tiger named "Soohorang", in the town of Hoenggye in Pyeongchang. (Photo by Jung Yeon-Je, AFP/Getty Images)
This photo taken February 4, 2017 shows the mascot for the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympic Games, a white tiger named “Soohorang”, in the town of Hoenggye in Pyeongchang.  (Photo by Jung Yeon-Je, AFP/Getty Images)

Several different nations have released, or scheduled, stamps marking the 2018 Winter Olympics. Those that I’ve heard about are pictured below, sourced from a variety of sources (I don’t have any of these in my collection…yet).

Belarus - 2018 Winter Olympics mini-sheet, released February 9, 2018 [mini-sheet]
Belarus – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 9, 2018 [mini-sheet]
Belarus - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 9, 2018 [first day cover]
Belarus – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 9, 2018 [first day cover]

Czech Republic – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 20, 2018
Czech Republic - 2018 Winter Paralympic Games, released January 20, 2018
Czech Republic – 2018 Winter Paralympic Games, released January 20, 2018
Estonia - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 12, 2018
Estonia – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 12, 2018
Estonia - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 12, 2018 [first day cover]
Estonia – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 12, 2018 [first day cover]
Hungary - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 2, 2018
Hungary – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 2, 2018
Hungary - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 2, 2018 [first day cover]
Hungary – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 2, 2018 [first day cover]
Latvia - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 2, 2018
Latvia – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 2, 2018

Latvia - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 2, 2018 [mini-sheet]
Latvia – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 2, 2018 [mini-sheet]
Latvia - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 2, 2018 [first day cover]
Latvia – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 2, 2018 [first day cover]

Liechtenstein - 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 13, 2017
Liechtenstein – 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 13, 2017
Liechtenstein - 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 13, 2017 [first day cover]
Liechtenstein – 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 13, 2017 [first day cover]
Lithuania - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018
Lithuania – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018

Lithuania - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018 [sheet 2]
Lithuania – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018 [sheet 1]
Lithuania - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018 [sheet 2]
Lithuania – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018 [sheet 2]

Monaco - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 8, 2018
Monaco – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 8, 2018
Poland - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 1, 2018
Poland – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 1, 2018

Poland - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 1, 2018 [mini-sheet]
Poland – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 1, 2018 [mini-sheet]
Poland - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 1, 2018 [first day cover]
Poland – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 1, 2018 [first day cover]

Serbia - 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 9, 2018
Serbia – 2018 Winter Olympics, released February 9, 2018
Slovakia - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 19, 2018
Slovakia – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 19, 2018
Slovenia - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018
Slovenia – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018

Slovenia - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018 [mini-sheet wth labels]
Slovenia – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018 [mini-sheet with labels]
Slovenia - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018 [first day cover]
Slovenia – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 26, 2018 [first day cover]
South Korea - 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 1, 2017 [first day cover of six stamps from souvenir sheet 1]
South Korea – 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 1, 2017 [first day cover of six stamps from souvenir sheet 1]
South Korea - 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 1, 2017 [first day cover of six stamps from souvenir sheet 2]
South Korea – 2018 Winter Olympics, released November 1, 2017 [first day cover of six stamps from souvenir sheet 2]

South Korea - 2018 Paralypmic Games stamp announcement
South Korea – 2018 Paralympic Games stamp announcement

South Korea - 2018 Paralympic Games, released January 18, 2018 [souvenir sheet]
South Korea – 2018 Paralympic Games, released January 18, 2018 [souvenir sheet]
South Korea - 2018 Paralypmic Games, released January 18, 2018 [first day cover - Logo]
South Korea – 2018 Paralympic Games, released January 18, 2018 [first day cover – Logo]
South Korea - 2018 Paralypmic Games, released January 18, 2018 [first day maximum card - Ice Hockey]
South Korea – 2018 Paralympic Games, released January 18, 2018 [first day maximum card – Ice Hockey]

Switzerland - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 30, 2018
Switzerland – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 30, 2018

Switzerland - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 30, 2018 [mini-sheet]
Switzerland – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 30, 2018 [mini-sheet]
Switzerland - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 30, 2018 [first day cover]
Switzerland – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January 30, 2018 [first day cover]
Ukraine - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January23, 2018 [mini-sheet]
Ukraine – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January23, 2018 [mini-sheet]
Ukraine - 2018 Winter Olympics, released January23, 2018 [first day cover]
Ukraine – 2018 Winter Olympics, released January23, 2018 [first day cover]
Ukraine - 2018 Winter Olympics [sheet of 28 mascot playing sports labels]
Ukraine – 2018 Winter Olympics, released ?? 2018 [sheet of 28 sports pictogram stamps]

If you know of any stamps released for the 2018 Olympic Winter Games, please let me know in the Comments (and include an image, if you can). Also, what is your favorite Winter Olympics sport? My favorites are bob-sledding and the ski jump).

Go U.S.A.! Go Thailand!