General Pursuits

Happy World Post Day!

Thailand #TH-1051 (2014)
Thailand #TH-1051 (2014)
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In Memorium, Thailand Philately

Thai Stamps for the Royal Cremation Ceremony

 

The Kingdom of Thailand is preparing for its final farewell to the most beloved monarch this nation has ever known. Even in Phuket, an island some 12 hours south of the capitol city of Bangkok by bus, one sees preparations for the massive funeral which will occur from October 25-29. Television, social media, and websites are almost exclusively black and white as of the beginning of this month and numerous commemorative items are beginning to fill local shops.

A new series of banknotes began circulating just under two weeks ago (I just received my first of the new 100-baht notes) and four commemorative coins are set for release in the near future; I may attempt to obtain the 100-baht coin but the gold 50,000-baht will have to remain a dream.

Three million copies of the new stamps are being released on October 25; I didn’t find out about the pre-sale (August 28-September 11) until a couple of days ago so hopefully I can find them on eBay or elsewhere (Thailand Post is certainly making it difficult to purchase their stamps lately). The stamps are really beautiful, but I can say that about virtually every stamp the Kingdom issues.

Three sheets will be released under the Thailand Post issue number TH-1135 and the official name “Royal Cremation Ceremony of the Late His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej Commemorative Stamps”. The first sheet will include nine 9-baht stamps bearing various portraits of His Majesty the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej, Rama the Ninth. The second sheet features three 3-baht stamps portraying major components of the Royal Cremation Ceremony — the Royal Urn, Phra Yannamat Sam Lam Khan (the Golden Palanquin with Three Poles), and Phra Maha Phicha Ratcharot (the Great Victory Royal Chariot). The third sheet contains a single 9-baht illustrating the Royal Crematorium and the candlelit mass mourning ceremony held at Bangkok’s Sanam Luang ceremonial ground on October 22, 2016. The background of this sheet features Dusit Maha Prasat Throne Hall, where the body of His Majesty King Bhumibol is lying in state.

These stamps, as so many other details about the Royal Cremation, have received extensive media coverage so I expect them to be rather difficult to obtain. Several Thai-based stamp dealers are already offering attractive presentation folders for the set. Older stamps portraying King Bhumibol have already seen high selling prices offered on eBay and other online auction sites.

While I have had to forgo a previously-planned trip to Bangkok in order to view the funeral processions due to work commitments, the 26th will be a public holiday so that the entire country can mourn on the day of the actual cremation. Each of Thailand’s 77 provinces has erected replicas of the massive funeral pyre (as well as nine replicas in Bangkok plus the original) so that people who cannot travel to the capital can participate locally. I plan to attend Phuket’s ceremony. I assume that there will be big-screen televisions near the local replica, broadcasting the procession in Bangkok.


General Pursuits, Stamped Holidays, Thailand Philately

October Is National Stamp Collecting Month

NOTE: This article also appears, virtually the same, on Asian Meanderings — my main blog about my life in Thailand.

Since 1981, the month of October has been celebrated as National Stamp Collecting Month in the United States and Canada. November is National Stamp Collecting Month in the Philippines.

I began collecting stamps around the age of nine years old; counting a few breaks for other pursuits (girls, music, travel to name but three), I estimate that I have been involved in the hobby for a little more than 30 years. I promote it whenever and wherever I can these days, having begun collecting again following my move to Thailand more than a decade ago.

November is National Stamp Collecting Month in The Philippines
November is National Stamp Collecting Month in The Philippines

At the beginning of July 2016, I started a blog called A Stamp A Day on which I feature a different stamp (usually from a different place) each and every day. Different countries and territories have been included in a more or less alphabetical order and historic anniversaries and birthdays have been marked on occasion with an appropriate stamp. The write-ups (background histories on the issuing entities and details about the stamps) are often quite lengthy!

ASAD” is my second stamp blog; Philatelic Pursuits is still active with a post or two each month. I also have a blog dedicated to postcards that I receive through Postcrossing, trades, or traveling friends and family members. I feel that the hobbies of philately (stamps) and deltiology (postcards) compliment each other. I recently changed the name of my postcard blog (for the third time) and it is now called Postcards to Phuket.

I live in Phuket, an island province in the south of Thailand. It wasn’t long after I’d arrived here that I discovered the Phuket Philatelic Museum in the administrative capital of Phuket Town. My first visit was in the midst of celebrations marking the 60th anniversary of the reign of His Majesty the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej. I’d already been struck at how Thai people worshiped the king as a deity and had been swept up in royal fever. Seeing the beautiful stamps issued in his honor spurred me to return to the hobby.

While never much of a museum (a few dusty displays of telegraph equipment and several frames of stamp “reproductions” at the present), the Phuket Philatelic Museum contained a large shop which was filled with Thai stamps dating back to the early 1970s (all sold for face value), first day covers for the previous year’s releases, albums and supplies in a dedicated room.

About three years ago, the shop was moved to a counter in the museum lobby to make room for Thailand’s first drive-thru post office. Many of the supplies such as albums and ornate stamp pages plus older stamps were gone but at least I could still purchase the new-release stamps and first day covers (going back a year or so) as well as the annual yearbooks. The main clerk spoke good English and was extremely helpful. She was reassigned about a year ago, replaced by a woman who speaks very little English but is quite cheerful and always let me go through the stock books.

I recently visited the Phuket Philatelic Museum for the first time in quite a while and was told that they weren’t selling stamps anymore. There were a few first day covers remaining (most of which I already had). The clerk told me she didn’t know if they would receive any stamps in the future. She seemed quite upset about it. I’m actually worried that the museum itself might close down as I believe the sales counter was the only income source. There’s a meeting room that I believe used to be used by a local stamp club but I could never get any information about meetings, etc. I’ve had ideas in the past to organize a Postcrossing meeting there amongst members who live on the island or to form my own stamp club, but I just haven’t had the time.

I am now unable to purchase any Thai stamps locally; one visit to a nearby post office left me wondering if the two clerks on duty even knew what a stamp was!) I will have to rely on mail order until I find someplace else. It’s a shame as there have been some very interesting stamps issued by Thailand recently. I am looking forward to finding out what Thailand Post has planned to mark the one-year anniversary of King Bhumibol’s death; there’s already been an extensive series of banknotes and coins announced by the Royal Thai Mint.

The whole of October leading up to His Majesty’s cremation at the end of the month will be a period of intensified mourning in Thailand. The initial period lasted from his death on October 13, 2016, to the beginning of December (his birthday) when his son formally accepted the succession and became King Rama X.

While a number of people have remained wearing black for the entire year (including all teachers such as myself), it will once again be expected in public starting (I believe) today. Since midnight last night, all Thai television stations are broadcasting in black and white only; most of my Thai friends have changed their Facebook profile and cover photos to greyscale today. The public are requested not to engage in any festivities during the month of October and many entertainment and sporting events will be canceled.  There will be many other signs of mourning and I will put together another article in the near future detailing some of those.

I plan to do my part by combining my celebration of National Stamp Collecting Month with a memorial to the late king. I’ve decided to feature only Thai stamps on A Stamp A Day during the month of October, mainly those portraying King Bhumibol. I plan to keep the commentary to a minimum so that I’ll have the time (and energy!) to write a few how-to-collect articles for Philatelic Pursuits and add a few things to Postcards to Phuket as well.

Happy Stamp Collecting Month(s)!

Postmark Calendar

Postmark Calendar: September

Philatelic Pursuits Postmark Calendar: September

September 1
Siam #17 (1887) postmark dated 1 September
Siam #17 (1887)
postmark dated 1 September
September 2
Mozambique #284 (1938)<br /> postmarked 2 September 1941<br /> Lourenço Marques (present-day Maputo)
Mozambique #284 (1938)
postmarked 2 September 1941
Lourenço Marques (present-day Maputo)
Thailand #528 (1969) postmarked 2 September 1969
Thailand #528 (1969)
postmarked 2 September BE 2512 (1969)
September 3
Natal #66 (1884) postmarked 3 September 1891
Natal #66 (1884)
postmarked 3 September 1891
September 4
Federal Republic of Germany #905 (1965) postmarked 4 September 1967
Federal Republic of Germany #905 (1965)
postmarked 4 September 1967

September 13

Bohemia and Moravia #35 (1939) postmarked 13 September 1940
Bohemia and Moravia #35 (1939)
postmarked 13 September 1940
Radnice, Rokycany District (present-day Czech Republic)
Isle of Man #20 (1973) postmarked 13 September 1973
Isle of Man #20 (1973)
postmarked 13 September 1973
Douglas, Isle of Man
Isle of Man #1352 (2008) postmarked 13 September 2008 Douglas, Isle of Man
Isle of Man #1352 (2008)
postmarked 13 September 2008
Douglas, Isle of Man
September 14
Straits Settlements #84 (1895) postmarked 14 September 1897 Penang (present-day Malaysia)
Straits Settlements #84 (1895)
postmarked 14 September 1897
Penang (present-day Malaysia)
Guernsey #34 (1970) postmarked 14 September 1970
Guernsey #34 (1970)
postmarked 14 September 1970
September 16
Queensland #91 (1890) postmarked 16 September 1890
Queensland #91 (1890)
postmarked 16 September 1890
Cambooya, Queensland
September 18
Lithuania #848b (2007) postmarked 13 September 2013 Vilnius, Lihtuania
Lithuania #848b (2007)
postmarked 13 September 2013
Vilnius, Lihtuania
September 19
Siam #75 (1899) postmarked 19 September xxxx
Siam #75 (1899)
postmarked 19 September xxxx
United States #790 (1936) postmarked 19 September 1942 Rhinebeck, New York
United States #790 (1936)
postmarked 19 September 1942
Rhinebeck, New York
September 22
Australia #159 (1936) postmarked 22 September 1936
Australia #159 (1936)
postmarked 22 September 1936
Malta #1246 (2006) postmarked 22 September 2006
Malta #1246 (2006)
postmarked 22 September 2006
September 27
Germany #123 (1920) postmarked 27 September 1920
Germany #123 (1920)
postmarked 27 September 1920
September 28
United States #11A (1851) postmarked 28 September 18xx
United States #11A (1851)
postmarked 28 September 18xx
September 29
Sweden #153 (1921) postmarked 29 September 1922
Sweden #153 (1921)
postmarked 29 September 1922
Thailand #1118 (1985)
General Pursuits, Space on Stamps, Topical Pursuits

Eclipse!

I’m just beginning work on tomorrow’s article for A Stamp A Day (and you can probably guess the stamp I’m going to feature). I am quite excited about the “Eclipse Across America” as the media is billing it as many of my friends and my immediate family live very near the 70-mile wide path of totality that will sweep coast to coast. I really wish I’d followed-through with my original plans to pay the States a visit in order to view this grand celestial event. The thought of Kansas in August, however, kept those plans from ever becoming too serious (well, that and the general lack of cash for Thailand to USA air tickets at this point in time).

In doing research for this ASAD article, I found that there have been a great number of stamps released in the past fifty years or so marking solar eclipses. Of these, I have exactly two — one is tomorrow’s featured stamp from the U.S.A. (which received a Scott catalogue number just in time: #5211) and the one that I wrote about for ASAD just over a year ago for Thailand’s National Science Day, Scott #1118). While a few are quite boring in design, the majority of the solar eclipse stamps I found on eBay were quite striking. I also discovered a vast array of interesting covers commemorating the observances in addition to the regular first day covers. What an interesting topic to collect! Adding such items to my collection would (somewhat) compensate for never having seen a total solar eclipse in person myself. I’m already planning a trip back to the States for the next one in 2024, a scant seven years away. I don’t want to make the same mistake twice (and doubt if I will last long enough to see the next total solar eclipse due for Thailand — in 2070!).

Thailand #1118 (1985)
Thailand #1118 (1985)

If you are in the States tomorrow, please don’t hesitate to get out there and look skyward. Even if you are in a location that will receive only a partial eclipse. Make some covers — there are bound to be a number of special postmarks in towns and cities along the path of totality and elsewhere! I will be seeking these out to add to my new thematic collection. I am already mentally planning the album pages. Now, to listen to Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon to get even more in the mood…

Happy Eclipse Day!

Postmark Calendar

Postmark Calendar: August

Postmark Calendar (August)
Postmark Calendar (August)

At the beginning of 2017, my favorite stamp blog (Big Blue 1840-1940) began a series “to present a postmark calendar for all the 366 possible days of the year, represented by interesting appropriate date cancellation stamps from the [Ralph A.] Kimble collection.” I thought this was a great idea and began going through scans of my collection to determine whether I could do something similar.

I came up with 255 stamps I could use for a Postmark Calendar of my own; this does include some duplicate dates. At the moment, the best-represented month is March. I did find out a couple of things in compiling stamps for my calendar: my eyesight is getting worse (time for a checkup!) and some dates are difficult to determine even when the postmark is clear. My criteria was simple: the month and date had to be clear; if I had to squint to figure out the date, I wouldn’t use it. I prefer to have the year included, but this wasn’t always possible. I also decided that I wouldn’t include postmarks from first day covers and other philatelic items.

While I was still going through my stamps examining their postmarks, I came across the Postmark Calendar thread on my favorite stamp collecting online forum, The Stamp Forum. The thread was started on August 11, 2013, and is now 122 pages strong! I began adding stamps to it around a month ago.

I love the format Jim has been following for his calendar entries on Big Blue so I’ll follow his model. After all, “imitation is the sincerest [form] of flattery” according to the quote by Charles Caleb Colton.

Philatelic Pursuits Postmark Calendar: August

August 4

Austria Sc#P9 (1867); postmark dated 4 August 1869
Austria Sc#P9 (1867)
postmark dated 4 August 1869
Germany Sc#108 (1920) Leipzig postmark dated 4 August 1920
Germany Sc#108 (1920)
Leipzig postmark dated 4 August 1920

August 5

Newfoundland Sc#190 (1932)
Registered postmark dated August 5

August 6

Malayan States: Penang Sc#62 (1960); Penang postmark dated 6 August 1960
Malayan States: Penang Sc#62 (1960)
Penang postmark dated 6 August 1960
Spain Sc#1698 (1972) postmark dated 6 August 1975
Spain Sc#1698 (1972)
postmark dated 6 August 1975

August 8

Germany Sc#128 (1920) postmark dated 8 August 1921
Germany Sc#128 (1920)
postmark dated 8 August 1921

August 9

Great Britain Sc#82 (1881) Mark Lane, London EC postmark dated August 9, 1884
Great Britain Sc#82 (1881)
Mark Lane, London EC postmark dated August 9, 1884
Abu Dhabi Sc#40 (1967) postmark dated 9 August 1969
Abu Dhabi Sc#40 (1967)
postmark dated 9 August 1969

August 10

St. Vincent Sc#40 (1883) Kingstown postmark dated August 10, 1894
St. Vincent Sc#40 (1883)
Kingstown postmark dated August 10, 1894

Kingstown is the capital, chief port, and main commercial center of Saint Vincent. Surrounded by steep hills, the town was founded by French settlers shortly after 1722, although Saint Vincent had 196 years of British rule before her independence. The botanical garden, conceived in 1765, is one of the oldest in the Western hemisphere. William Bligh, made famous from the Mutiny on the Bounty, brought seeds of the breadfruit tree here for planting in 1793.

August 13

Siam Sc#84 (1899) Bangkok postmark dated 13 August
Siam Sc#84 (1899)
Bangkok postmark dated 13 August

August 14

Austria Sc#15 (1860) postmark dated 14 August
Austria Sc#15 (1860)
postmark dated 14 August

August 15

Austria Sc#14 (1860) postmark dated 15 August 1862
Austria Sc#14 (1860)
postmark dated 15 August 1862

August 18

Victoria Sc#169 (1890) Melbourne postmark dated August 18, 1899
Victoria Sc#169 (1890)
Melbourne postmark dated August 18, 1899
Netherlands Indies Sc#55 (1904) postmark dated 18 August 1908
Netherlands Indies Sc#55 (1904)
postmark dated 18 August 1908

August 19

Germany Sc#203 (1923) postmark dated 19 August 1923
Germany Sc#203 (1923)
postmark dated 19 August 1923
Ghana Sc#291 (1967) Accra postmark dated 20 August 1971 [digitally cropped for calendar above]
Ghana Sc#291 (1967)
Accra postmark dated 20 August 1971
[digitally cropped for calendar above]

Accra is the capital and most populous city of Ghana, with an estimated urban population of 2.27 million as of 2012. The city stretches along the Ghanaian Atlantic coast and extends north inland. Originally built around three different settlements, including a port (Jamestown), it served as the capital of the British Gold Coast between 1877 and 1957. Once merely a 19th-century suburb of Victoriaborg, Accra has since transitioned into a modern metropolis; the city’s architecture reflects this history, ranging from 19th-century architecture buildings to modern skyscrapers and apartment blocks.

August 21

United States Sc#4025 (2006) Lake Forest, California postmark dated August 21
United States Sc#4025 (2006)
Lake Forest, California postmark dated August 21

Lake Forest is a city in Orange County, California, that incorporated as a city on December 20, 1991. Prior to incorporation, the community had been known as El Toro. Following a vote in 2000, Lake Forest expanded its city limits to include the master-planned developments of Foothill Ranch and Portola Hills. This expansion brought new homes and commercial centers to the Northeastern boundary of the city. Lake Forest (along with its neighboring cities Mission Viejo and Irvine) is ranked as one of the safest cities in the country. The population was 77,264 at the 2010 census.

August 22

Chile Sc#29 (1885) Santiago postmark dated 22 August 1895
Chile Sc#29 (1885)
Santiago postmark dated 22 August 1895

Founded in 1541, Santiago has been the capital city of Chile since colonial times. The city has a downtown core of 19th-century neoclassical architecture and winding side-streets, dotted by art deco, neo-gothic, and other styles. Santiago’s cityscape is shaped by several stand-alone hills and the fast-flowing Mapocho River, lined by parks such as Parque Forestal. The Andes Mountains can be seen from most points in the city. These mountains contribute to a considerable smog problem, particularly during winter. The city outskirts are surrounded by vineyards and Santiago is within a few hours of both the mountains and the Pacific Ocean.

August 23

Ghana Sc#419 (1971) Accra postmark dated 23 August 1971
Ghana Sc#419 (1971)
Accra postmark dated 23 August 1971
[digitally cropped for the calendar above]
Jersey Sc#39 (1971) postmark dated 23 August 1972
Jersey Sc#39 (1971)
postmark dated 23 August 1972

August 24

Germany Sc#237 (1923) Wesel postmark dated 24 August 1923
Germany Sc#237 (1923)
Wesel postmark dated 24 August 1923

Wesel originated from a Franconian manor that was first recorded in the 8th century. In the 12th century, the Duke of Clèves took possession of Wesel. The city became a member of the Hanseatic League during the 15th century. Within the Duchy of Cleves, Wesel was second only to Cologne in the lower Rhine region as an entrepôt. It was an important commercial center: a clearing station for the transshipment and trading of goods. Wesel is situated at the confluence of the Lippe River and the Rhine in North Rhine-Westphalia.

August 25

Isle Of Man Sc#230 (1983) postmark dated 25 August 198x
Isle Of Man Sc#230 (1983)
postmark dated 25 August 198x

August 28

Jersey Sc#762 (1996) postmark dated 28 August 1996
Jersey Sc#762 (1996)
postmark dated 28 August 1996
General Pursuits

400 Posts… Wow!

Not here, but on my “other” stamp blog — A Stamp A Day. It just snuck up on me. I published an article a few minutes ago about Trinidad & Tobago, illustrating the ½ penny green Britannia (my copy might be Scott #1, released in 1913, but it’s probably a later issue as the postmark is dated in 1924), and noticed the post count. The amazing thing is that I started the blog just over one year ago — July 1, 2016. I never thought I would be able to maintain daily entries for more than a few months; the blog’s name kept me going — even when it was the last thing I wanted to do on certain days, even when work or the weather or unreliable Internet all seemed to transpire against me. Four hundred posts. Wow, indeed!

By contrast, I started this blog — Philatelic Pursuits — on May 25, 2015. This will be my 97th entry. I’ll have to think of something special for #100, just as I’ll need to pick a significant stamp for ASAD’s 500th post. I can’t let that one sneak past me like this one nearly did….